Archeology Continues to Point Toward Bible’s Reliability

Ecclesiastes 9:7    “Go, eat your food with gladness, and drink your wine with a joyful heart,…”

A 3000 year old inscription on a wine jog dated to about the mid-10th Century BC could well give further support to the kingdoms of David and Solomon.

Jerusalem always has someone digging around, looking for something of historical importance. Sometimes it’s garden variety stuff.  Sometimes they find something that will make the weeks of tedium worth it.

“A small fragment of ancient pottery researchers believe shows the first wine label could prove that the reigns of King Solomon and King David actually occurred.”

It dates to mid-10th Century BC, just about right for David and Solomon.  It is written in an ancient form of Hebrew, which has been a challenge to decipher, but they know it was a wine label  inscribed on the remains of a jug.  The term used for wine denotes a vintage that was pretty low quality and likely reserved for slaves and workers.  That alone sheds some new light on the period.

The find is by Gershon Galil from the department of Jewish History at Haifa University. I’ll leave you to read the article for yourself to get the details from Galil.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2546917/3-000-year-old-recipe-WINE-proves-Old-Testament-TRUE.html

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Archeology Continues to Point Toward Bible’s Reliability

  1. Those Acts ^& Facts from the Creation Institution have lots of good fact and artifacts etc. supporting Bible and all of creation…hope you signed on for a free subscription…it is super!

Your ideas are important too!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s